Please note, this is not an open access database or repository. We have focused on creating simple summaries of reports and articles that we have accessed through websites and academic journals, with a focus on key findings, so that even if a full report is not free to access you can reference it. When possible, we include a link to wherever the original document is hosted (which may or may not be open-access). If you come across a link that is no longer active, please let us know and we can update it. There are also some reports that will have been submitted directly to the project. In this case, these reports are uploaded directly with permission from the author or publisher. Any original documents found on this site are stored in Canada on our secure servers

Integration Experiences of Newcomers Across the Prairies: Untangling Perceived Dichotomy Between Immigrants and New-to-Towns

Despite the lack of a shared definition of integration, this concept word addresses the physical, psychological, and social progress of newcomers, and more. Newcomers are both immigrants and new-to-town individuals, meaning those who have relocated within Canada from other provinces or regions. By exploring literature and lived experiences, this research examines how accurately models of integration reflect and represent the views and experiences of newcomers. Our qualitative case study uses thematic coding of in-depth interviews with newcomers and settlement organizations. Results suggest that models and factors of integration do not fully or effectively reflect the process and desires of newcomers. Though new-to-town individuals possess advantages in their relocation process (e.g., not having to learn a new language or build a cultural foundation in their new location), they do not meet nor do they aspire to meet all the various factors and considerations of integration included in the models. Newcomers seek first to meet their own core needs followed by self-directed needs. In this article, an acculturation model is put forward that encompasses dynamics of individual newcomers’ peculiarities of circumstances. The conclusion is two-fold: Newcomers place priority on immediate core needs and strive to meet other needs leading to place attachment; and their sense of belonging can be brought into question with experiences of discrimination and racism. Despite the lack of a shared definition of integration, this concept word addresses the physical, psychological, and social progress of newcomers, and more. Newcomers are both immigrants and new-to-town individuals, meaning those who have relocated within Canada from other provinces or regions. By exploring literature and lived experiences, this research examines how accurately models of integration reflect and represent the views and experiences of newcomers. Our qualitative case study uses thematic coding of in-depth interviews with newcomers and settlement organizations. Results suggest that models and factors of integration do not fully or effectively reflect the process and desires of newcomers. Though new-to-town individuals possess advantages in their relocation process (e.g., not having to learn a new language or build a cultural foundation in their new location), they do not meet nor do they aspire to meet all the various factors and considerations of integration included in the models. Newcomers seek first to meet their own core needs followed by self-directed needs. In this article, an acculturation model is put forward that encompasses dynamics of individual newcomers’ peculiarities of circumstances. The conclusion is two-fold: Newcomers place priority on immediate core needs and strive to meet other needs leading to place attachment; and their sense of belonging can be brought into question with experiences of discrimination and racism.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

Who’s The North? The Challenge that Immigration and Diversity Present to the Dominance of Hockey in 21st Century Canada

This paper examines how the growing diversity of Canada’s population has modified the viewership and participation in what is widely considered the country’s national sport: hockey. We contend that while hockey remains the country’s most popular sport, its domination is increasingly challenged by the attraction to soccer and basketball amongst the expanding numbers of Canadians of non-European origins. The paper also considers how the demographic shifts will influence the extent to which youth participation in hockey remains a key vector in promoting belonging to Canada. In this regard, we found that hockey is relatively unchallenged as the sport that contributes most to a stronger sense of local belonging amongst newcomers. This paper examines how the growing diversity of Canada’s population has modified the viewership and participation in what is widely considered the country’s national sport: hockey. We contend that while hockey remains the country’s most popular sport, its domination is increasingly challenged by the attraction to soccer and basketball amongst the expanding numbers of Canadians of non-European origins. The paper also considers how the demographic shifts will influence the extent to which youth participation in hockey remains a key vector in promoting belonging to Canada. In this regard, we found that hockey is relatively unchallenged as the sport that contributes most to a stronger sense of local belonging amongst newcomers.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

Immigrant Mothers’ Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators in Accessing Mental Health Care for Their Children

Data on immigrant and refugees’ access to services in Canada does not typically focus on children. To fill this gap, this study explored immigrant and refugee mothers’ perceptions of barriers and facilitators (things that help) for mental health care for their children in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Barriers included financial strain, lack of information, racism/discrimination, language barriers, stigma, feeling isolated, and feeling unheard by service providers. Facilitators included schools offering services, personal levels of higher education, and free services. Nurses can improve access to mental health services by addressing issues related to racism within the health system, by creating awareness related to mental health, and by providing trained interpreters to help bridge barriers in communications. Data on immigrant and refugees’ access to services in Canada does not typically focus on children. To fill this gap, this study explored immigrant and refugee mothers’ perceptions of barriers and facilitators (things that help) for mental health care for their children in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Barriers included financial strain, lack of information, racism/discrimination, language barriers, stigma, feeling isolated, and feeling unheard by service providers. Facilitators included schools offering services, personal levels of higher education, and free services. Nurses can improve access to mental health services by addressing issues related to racism within the health system, by creating awareness related to mental health, and by providing trained interpreters to help bridge barriers in communications.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

Alberta Settlement And Integration Sector Survey Report 2017-2018

This is a provincial survey from January to February 2018. The survey aimed to examine and understand the priorities, systems-level issues and areas of improvement in settlement and integration, to identify any current systems-level issues that are affecting service provider organizations (SPOs), and to highlight areas of improvement for the next fiscal year. The survey findings indicate that the main challenge affecting newcomers is access to Language Programs. When the survey asked participants what the most common barrier that affected individuals’ ability to attend language training the most, over 70% of respondents indicated Childcare Provision and Availability. The findings also show that lack of childcare provision affects newcomers’ ability to access not only education (language programs), but also employment and social activities. Service providers indicated that they experience challenges with data collection which prevents sharing data between organizations. This in turn affects the quality of service delivery. Service providers also expressed a desire for increased sector engagement meaning that they were interested in large-scale events such as summits and seminars. The survey results also indicate that AAISA’s research and policy resources are not being used to a large extent for settlement practices, policy change and funding models. AAISA is committed to increase efforts into changing this tendency and establishing more meaningful connections with the government and policy stakeholders. This is a provincial survey from January to February 2018. The survey aimed to examine and understand the priorities, systems-level issues and areas of improvement in settlement and integration, to identify any current systems-level issues that are affecting service provider organizations (SPOs), and to highlight areas of improvement for the next fiscal year. The survey findings indicate that the main challenge affecting newcomers is access to Language Programs. When the survey asked participants what the most common barrier that affected individuals’ ability to attend language training the most, over 70% of respondents indicated Childcare Provision and Availability. The findings also show that lack of childcare provision affects newcomers’ ability to access not only education (language programs), but also employment and social activities. Service providers indicated that they experience challenges with data collection which prevents sharing data between organizations. This in turn affects the quality of service delivery. Service providers also expressed a desire for increased sector engagement meaning that they were interested in large-scale events such as summits and seminars. The survey results also indicate that AAISA’s research and policy resources are not being used to a large extent for settlement practices, policy change and funding models. AAISA is committed to increase efforts into changing this tendency and establishing more meaningful connections with the government and policy stakeholders.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

Parenting challenges of African immigrants in Alberta, Canada

African immigrant children and youth have some of the poorest social and mental health outcomes in Canada. Although parenting challenges have been widely documented as a key driver of these outcomes, this issue has not been properly researched. In this paper, we examine parenting challenges among a sample of African immigrant parents in Alberta, Canada. We discovered main parenting challenges, organized around six overarching themes. Specifically, African immigrant parents deal with cultural incompatibility, family tension, state interference, limited social supports, poor access to services, and low socioeconomic status. Thus the state policy regarding child protection needs to change, and social service organization need to tailor their programmes to cultural specificities of African communities. African immigrant children and youth have some of the poorest social and mental health outcomes in Canada. Although parenting challenges have been widely documented as a key driver of these outcomes, this issue has not been properly researched. In this paper, we examine parenting challenges among a sample of African immigrant parents in Alberta, Canada. We discovered main parenting challenges, organized around six overarching themes. Specifically, African immigrant parents deal with cultural incompatibility, family tension, state interference, limited social supports, poor access to services, and low socioeconomic status. Thus the state policy regarding child protection needs to change, and social service organization need to tailor their programmes to cultural specificities of African communities.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

Resettling in the Canadian Prairies: A Survey of Syrian Refugees in Canada’s Prairies

This study assesses the services provided in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba in response to the Syrian refugee crisis in terms of housing needs, language training, and job search experiences. Upon arrival, the vast majority of the refugees are provided short-term accommodation in hotels. Only one third, however, is satisfied with the response to their housing needs. Women are not facing as much difficulty as men. Compared to PSRs, the GARs are face greater difficulty finding work in Alberta. This study assesses the services provided in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba in response to the Syrian refugee crisis in terms of housing needs, language training, and job search experiences. Upon arrival, the vast majority of the refugees are provided short-term accommodation in hotels. Only one third, however, is satisfied with the response to their housing needs. Women are not facing as much difficulty as men. Compared to PSRs, the GARs are face greater difficulty finding work in Alberta.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly

A profile of immigrant health in Calgary

It is well documented that immigrant and racialized groups often experience greater access barriers to health and social services in Canada. This occurs because of multiple factors including language, transportation, information, service fees, and discrimination. This report provides a profile of immigrant health in Calgary. Key findings include significant differences between immigrants and their Canadian-born counterparts in rates of unmet health care needs, physical health status, mental health status, sense of belonging to the local community, and the number and presence of chronic conditions experienced. The results often differ by immigrants’ length of time in Canada, which is also associated with age. Significant differences between immigrants and the Canadian-born population in the Calgary Zone are also found in rates of racialized identity, having a mother tongue other than English, living arrangements, sexual orientation, employment, and educational attainment—often differing by immigrants’ length of time in Canada. In addition, there are statistically significant differences between immigrants and their Canadian-born counterparts in terms of health care access and general health status, some of which may have implications for service provision and, ultimately, health outcomes. In sum, this research demonstrates statistically significant differences in several of the social determinants of health, in health care access and general health status, and in the health outcomes experienced by immigrants as compared to Canadian-born individuals living in the Calgary Zone Community Health Region. It is well documented that immigrant and racialized groups often experience greater access barriers to health and social services in Canada. This occurs because of multiple factors including language, transportation, information, service fees, and discrimination. This report provides a profile of immigrant health in Calgary. Key findings include significant differences between immigrants and their Canadian-born counterparts in rates of unmet health care needs, physical health status, mental health status, sense of belonging to the local community, and the number and presence of chronic conditions experienced. The results often differ by immigrants’ length of time in Canada, which is also associated with age. Significant differences between immigrants and the Canadian-born population in the Calgary Zone are also found in rates of racialized identity, having a mother tongue other than English, living arrangements, sexual orientation, employment, and educational attainment—often differing by immigrants’ length of time in Canada. In addition, there are statistically significant differences between immigrants and their Canadian-born counterparts in terms of health care access and general health status, some of which may have implications for service provision and, ultimately, health outcomes. In sum, this research demonstrates statistically significant differences in several of the social determinants of health, in health care access and general health status, and in the health outcomes experienced by immigrants as compared to Canadian-born individuals living in the Calgary Zone Community Health Region.
This publication has no Abstract to dispaly